Japan’s dwindling workforce

The working-age population of Japan decreased further in 2018, altering its ratio to the general population to a record low, according to government data.

Meanwhile, the growth of foreign-born inhabitants is accelerating with multiple graduates opting to teach English in Japanese schools.

The Internal Affairs and Communications Ministry released the aforementioned data which translates to the country’s worsening labor crisis. This in turn led to the government introducing a new visa system this month to attract more foreign workers to carry out blue-collar jobs.

The overall population as of October 2018, plummeted from 127 million to 126 million, following the declining trend set by previous years.

On the other hand, the number of foreign people grew from 167,000 to 2.23 million, growing for the sixth straight year.

The Justice Ministry estimates that the large number of foreign residents can be attributed to the rise in students and trainees.

Japan, which is known for its strict immigration policy, now expects to accept up to 345,000 foreign laborers under its new visa program.

Japan’s population has been diminishing since reaching its peak at 128.08 million in 2008. The National Institute of Population and Social Security Research predicts that the population will fall below 100 million by 2053.