Plane, Train, Boat and Booze

There’s no question part of travel involves indulgence.  That can mean a massage at the hotel spa, a fancy meal, or an upgrade to a business class seat.

But a simple indulgence seems to keep getting an upgrade.

I’m talking about the alcohol that’s served on cruise ships, trains and on airplanes.

I remember a time, when the booze served on planes was simply a middle of the road name brand beer.  But over the years there has been a shift.

Now craft beers are becoming established on many airline menus.  For example, if you fly Southwest, you can certainly get a Miller Light.  But there some more boutique like options.  This includes Leinenkugel’s Summer Shandy and Lagunitas 12th of Never Ale.

From the sky to the sea, Carnival Cruises is now the first cruise line to make its own libations.  The Carnival Horizon and Carnival Vista have their own in-house brewery team, according to a recent press release.

Amtrak offers the standard fare on its National Café Car menu, such as Heineken and Bud Light, as well as Sierra Nevada Pale Ale and Stone IPA.

Hard liquor has also been taken up a notch over the years.  On its flight menu, discount carrier Frontier Airlines is offering Breckenridge Vodka, Breckenridge Bourbon, and Breckenridge Gin.

In some cases, especially on long haul flights, beer and wine are complimentary.

But at the end of the day, these are good money makers in addition to tickets revenue. Passengers are willing to pay.

Yet, there should be some caution.  Many of the disruptions we see on the news happen in part because the passengers are not sober.